);
Connect with us

Around Atlanta

High Museum of Art Celebrates 25th Anniversary of “Picturing the South” Photography Series with exhibition

Published

on

Kael Alford ( American, born 1971 ), Stranded Indian Land with Oil Boom, after the British Petroleum Oil Spill , So , 2010 , pigmented inkjet print , High Museum of Art, Atlanta, commissioned with funds from Paul Hagedorn, Phyllis and Sidney Rodbell , and the H. B. and Doris Massey Charitable Trust , 20 12 .26.22. © Kael Alford.

Uniting works from all past commissions with new photographs by Sheila Pree Bright, Jim Goldberg and An-My Lê 

Launched in 1996, the High Museum of Art’s renowned “Picturing the South” series supports contemporary photographers in creating new bodies of work inspired by the American South for the High’s collection, which is among the nation’s leading photography programs and has strength in work made in and about the region. To commemorate the series’ 25th anniversary, the High will present “Picturing the South: 25 Years” (Nov. 5, 2021-Feb. 6, 2022), which will bring together for the first time nearly 200 works from all the past commissions by artists including Dawoud Bey, Sally Mann and Richard Misrach and will debut new work by the latest photographers selected for the series, Sheila Pree Bright, Jim Goldberg and An-My Lê.

“The ‘Picturing the South’ commission and exhibition series is entirely unique among American museums for its longevity, commitment to place and diversity of artistic perspectives,” said Rand Suffolk, the High’s Nancy and Holcombe T. Green, Jr., director. “For a quarter century, the series has called attention to the fabric of our shared experiences while concurrently highlighting what makes the South distinctive. We are thrilled to show the commissioned works collectively for the first time and to demonstrate how transformational ‘Picturing the South’ has been for the High and for the artists who’ve participated.” 

Kael Alford (American, born 1971), Joseph and Jasmon Jackson Play in the Bayou, Isle de Jean Charles, Louisiana, 2010, pigmented inkjet print, High Museum of Art, Atlanta, commissioned with funds from Paul Hagedorn, Phyllis and Sidney Rodbell, and the H. B. and Doris Massey Charitable Trust, 2012.26.12. © Kael Alford.

Kevin W. Tucker, the High’s chief curator, added, “‘Picturing the South’ both reflects a rich legacy from the many artists represented through these commissions and acknowledges the High’s continuing dedication to collecting and exhibiting contemporary American photography.”

“Picturing the South” has produced a total of 16 extraordinary bodies of work, some of which have become iconic projects for the artists, including: 

  • Sally Mann’s major shift from portraiture to exploring the complex terrain of the Southern landscape.
  • Dawoud Bey’s contemplative portraits of Atlanta high school students.
  • Richard Misrach’s 10-year study of the Mississippi River’s industrialized corridor known as “Cancer Alley.”
  • Alec Soth’s first photographs in what would become his remarkable series “Broken Manual.” 

In addition to examples from those series, the exhibition will feature works from each of the other completed commissions by Kael Alford, Debbie Fleming Caffery, Emmet Gowin, Alex Harris, Shane Lavalette, Abelardo Morell, Martin Parr, Mark Steinmetz and Alex Webb. 

The new commissions by Bright, Goldberg and Lê each will shed light on prevailing themes and movements in the South, including racial and national identity. Bright’s mysterious black-and-white photographs of Stone Mountain, a public recreation area that surrounds the largest monument to the Confederacy, scrutinize the literal and figurative marks that the region’s history of white supremacy has left on the land. Goldberg explores expressions of contemporary dynamics of racial identity in the South, with a particular eye to how notions of whiteness are articulated in a society that regularly assumes it as the default American identity. Lê’s photographs center on the social unrest that has emerged across the country, including protests in Washington, D.C. 

“The ‘Picturing the South’ photographs address broad themes, from the legacy of slavery and racial justice to the social implications of the evolving landscape and the distinct and diverse character of the region’s people,” said Gregory Harris, the High’s Donald and Marilyn Keough Family curator of photography. “The works together tell a compelling story of the contemporary South and will offer audiences a unique opportunity to see the region through the lenses of some of the best photographers working today.”  

To coincide with the exhibition, the High will publish digital resources for “Picturing the South: 25 Years” comprising artwork annotations and multimedia content, including a virtual tour, on an interactive online platform. 

The exhibition will be presented in the Cousins Special Exhibition Galleries on the second level of the High’s Wieland Pavilion. 

Continue Reading

Around Atlanta

Alliance Theatre’s 2021-22 In-Person Season Calendar

Published

on

The 53rd season will feature eight productions including the previously announced HANDS UP  and TONI STONE, and four world premieres including the musical DARLIN’ CORY  by Phillip DePoy and Grammy Award winner Kristian Bush, plus, a world premiere musical directed by Tony Award winner Kenny Leon to be announced later this summer, & the 2021/22 Alliance/Kendeda National Graduate Playwriting Competition winner, DREAM HOU$E

The new season will also introduce the Alliance’s elaborate new adaption of A CHRISTMAS CAROL, featuring a new script, set, and costume design.

Atlanta’s nationally acclaimed Alliance Theatre, Jennings Hertz Artistic Director Susan V. Booth, and Managing Director Mike Schleifer, are pleased to announce the productions of the Alliance’s 53rd season.  After a year that saw the Alliance produce a variety of new works for streaming platforms, an animated film, a drive-in production, and an outdoor tent series, the Alliance is excited to announce a return to in-person performances on its Coca-Cola Stage and Hertz Stage beginning in September 2021.  The new season will feature eight productions including four world premieres, two musicals, and an elaborate new staging of its annual production, A CHRISTMAS CAROL

“As a theater, we’ve been able to do a lot in this past upside-down year. The same commitment which helped us continue inspiring thousands of Atlantans (and beyond) while our stages were dark will enable us to do more innovative, equitable, and uplifting work as we come together in-person for our 2021/22 season,” said Susan V. Booth, Jennings Hertz Artistic Director.  “After the past year of pivoting with speed, agility, and yes, humor that we might never have imagined, it is thrilling to be announcing today our plans for the productions of our 53rd season.”

The 2021/22 season will begin in September on the recently renovated and award-winning Coca-Cola Stage with DARLIN’ CORY, a haunting new musical inspired by local lore with an original folk-country score by Grammy Award winner and Sugarland front man Kristian Bush (Troubadour), book by playwright and novelist Phillip DePoy (Edward Foote), and direction by Susan V. Booth. 

Opening the Hertz Stage in October is THE NEW BLACK FEST’S HANDS UP: 7 PLAYWRIGHTS, 7 TESTAMENTS.  HANDS UP depicts the realities of Black America from the perspective of varying genders, sexual orientations, skin tones, and socioeconomic backgrounds.  This production of HANDS UP is co-directed by Spelman Associate Professor Keith Arthur Bolden and Spelman alumna and Alliance Spelman Fellow Alexis Woodard.

In November, the Alliance will unveil the new adaptation of its annual production A CHRISTMAS CAROL by David H. Bell with direction by Leora Morris.  This reimagined version features a new scenic design by Tony Award winner Todd Rosenthal, costume design by Mariann Verheyen, lighting design by Greg Hofmann, sound design by Clay Benning, original music by Kendall Simpson, and puppet design by Tom Lee and Blair Thomas. 

Next up for the Hertz Stage is CLUB HERTZ LIVE – a music series that will host some of Atlanta’s most exciting performers and musicians in a relaxed lounge atmosphere.  CLUB HERTZ LIVE will feature a new act each night and a variety of genres during the month of December.  Bands and performers will be chosen by a panel of music-industry professionals.  Performers are invited to apply to be a part of the series on the Alliance’s website here.

In January 2022, the Alliance will produce the world premiere of this year’s Alliance/Kendeda National Graduate Playwriting Competition winner, DREAM HOU$E, by Eliana Pipes of Boston University.  In DREAM HOU$E, two sisters go on a reality tv show to renovate and sell their childhood home.  The show quickly drives a wedge between the sisters as they come to terms with how much of their family’s heritage they are willing to sacrifice in this funny and touching look at the truths of gentrification.     

On the Coca-Cola Stage, the Alliance will present TONI STONE, the “must-see play” (TheatreMania) by Lydia R. Diamond based on the true story of the first female athlete to play professional baseball in the Negro Leagues.  Toni Stone is a heartwarming and fascinating story of race, gender, and raw ambition.  This production will be directed by the Alliance’s BOLD Artistic Director Fellow Tinashe Kajese-Bolden and is a co-production with Milwaukee Rep.

In March 2022, the Alliance will produce the world premiere of BINA’S SIX APPLES by Lloyd Suh and directed by Obie Award winner Eric Ting.  Set against the backdrop of the Korean War, BINA’S SIX APPLES is a harrowing and uplifting story of courage and finding home.  BINA’S SIX APPLES is a co-production with Children’s Theatre Company.   

Closing the season on the Coca-Cola Stage, the Alliance will produce a world premiere musical with direction by Tony Award winner, Kenny Leon.  Leon is known to Atlanta audiences as the former Artistic Director of Alliance Theatre and as the Founder and Artistic Director Emeritus of Kenny Leon’s True Colors Theatre. The details of the new production will be announced later this summer. 

In addition to the Alliance Series on the Coca-Cola Stage and Hertz Series on the Hertz Stage, the Alliance will produce five productions for the Kathy & Ken Bernhardt Theatre for the Very Young – two for streaming and three in-person productions in the Selig Family Blackbox at Alliance Theatre.  The titles in the Theatre for the Very Young Season are SOUNDS OF THE WEST END (streaming); THE CURIOUS CARDINAL (streaming); KNOCK, KNOCK; IN MY GRANNY’S GARDEN; and DO YOU LOVE THE DARK?.  This season marks the 10th anniversary of the Kathy & Ken Bernhardt Theatre for the Very Young program, which commissions and produces new works designed for children five years old and younger. 

To prepare for audiences to return to the theater, the Alliance has replaced all HVAC units with HVAC ionization systems, which provide a 99.4% reduction of COVID-19 within 30 minutes.  HVAC ionization is more effective than other air-cleaning methods and helps kill other types of viruses, such as the flu, and air pollutants.  The Alliance has also increased the cleaning schedule of surfaces in the theater, modified the ticketing process to eliminate physical tickets, and increased the number of hand-sanitizing stations across the campus.  The Alliance will continue to closely monitor local, state, and federal policies regarding indoor activities and plan our safety protocols accordingly.  

When possible, live performances of the 53rd season will be filmed for streaming on the Alliance Theatre’s streaming platform, Alliance Theatre Anywhere.

DARLIN’ CORY (World Premiere Musical)​
September 8 – October 3, 2021
Coca-Cola Stage at Alliance Theatre​

Book by Phillip DePoy

Music by Kristian Bush

Lyrics by Phillip DePoy and Kristian Bush
Directed by Susan V. Booth​

Set against the backdrop of 1930s Appalachia, DARLIN’ CORY is a haunting new musical by playwright & novelist Phillip DePoy (EDWARD FOOTE) and Sugarland’s front man & Grammy Award winner Kristian Bush (TROUBADOUR).  In a tiny mountain town with no road in – and no road out – a community carries secrets of all sizes.  But when a young woman with ambition and intelligence collides with a pastor deeply committed to preserving the status quo, cracks begin to form in the town’s well-constructed façade. And when a stranger appears with a mysterious backstory and the best moonshine anyone’s ever tasted – some of those secrets threaten to spill.  With an original folk-country score, this modern-day myth inspired by local lore promises to leave audiences on the edge of their seats.  For tickets and information, visit www.alliancetheatre.org/darlin

A CHRISTMAS CAROL​ (new adaptation)
November 12 – December 24, 2021
Coca-Cola Stage at Alliance Theatre​

By Charles Dickens​
Adapted by David H. Bell​
Directed by Leora Morris​

The Alliance Theatre’s beloved production A CHRISTMAS CAROL will return to the Coca-Cola Stage this year with an exciting new adaption, including a completely reimagined set design and stunning new costumes. Audiences will be transported to the streets of London to revisit the timeless story of Ebenezer Scrooge’s journey to redemption, told with beautiful live music and an all-star cast. Join the Alliance Theatre for one of Atlanta’s most treasured holiday traditions.  For tickets and information, visit www.alliancetheatre.org/carol

TONI STONE 
February 10 – 27, 2022​
Coca-Cola Stage at Alliance Theatre​

By Lydia R. Diamond​
Directed by Tinashe Kajese-Bolden​

Considered a pioneer, Toni Stone is the first woman to play baseball in the Negro Leagues, also making her the first woman to play professionally in a men’s league.  Against all odds, Toni blazes a path in the male-dominated sports world, breaking through the limitations others placed on her, and creating her own set of rules. Follow Toni’s journey as she fights for love, equality and a chance to do what she wants the most — play some world class baseball. Declared the Best New Play of 2019 by The Wall Street Journal, TONI STONE is a funny and fascinating story of race, gender, and raw ambition… and an unheralded superstar you will never forget.  ​For tickets and info, visit www.alliancetheatre.org/tonistone

BINA’S SIX APPLES (world premiere)
March 11 – 27, 2022​
Coca-Cola Stage at Alliance Theatre​

By Lloyd Suh​
Directed by Eric Ting​

Bina’s family grows the finest apples in all of Korea. But when war forces her to flee her home, Bina is alone in the world with just six precious apples to her name. Can these meager possessions help her find her family?  Join Bina on her spirited journey that ranges from the heartbreaking to the humorous. Encountering new challenges at every turn, Bina is forced to rely upon her apples and their important legacy as she begins to discover the power of her own resilience. Often mesmerizing, always heartwarming, Bina will discover that she’s not the only one on a difficult quest for a place to call home. For tickets and info, visit www.alliancetheatre.org/binasapples

A World Premiere Musical, to be announced later this summer
May 25 – June 26, 2022​
Coca-Cola Stage at Alliance Theatre​

Directed by Kenny Leon


HERTZ SERIES

THE NEW BLACK FEST’S 
HANDS UP: 7 PLAYWRIGHTS, 7 TESTAMENTS
October 8 – 31, 2021​
Hertz Stage at Alliance Theatre​

By Nathan James, Nathan Yungerberg, Idris Goodwin, Nambi E. Kelley, Nsangou Njikam,
Eric Holmes, and Dennis Allen II​
Co-Directed by Keith Arthur Bolden and Alexis Woodard​

Across seven monologues written by seven Black playwrights, HANDS UP depicts the realities of Black America from the perspective of varying genders, sexual orientations, skin tones, and socioeconomic backgrounds. The play was originally commissioned in 2015 by the New Black Fest in response to a police officer fatally shooting an unarmed Black teenager, Michael Brown in Ferguson, MO. The themes and stories it tells still ring true today. HANDS UP is produced in association with Spelman College.​  For tickets and information, visit www.alliancetheatre.org/handsup

CLUB HERTZ LIVE

December 8 – 24, 2021

Hertz Stage at Alliance Theatre

Experience a special concert series featuring some of Atlanta’s most exciting performers and musicians in a relaxed lounge atmosphere.  CLUB HERTZ LIVE will feature a new performer each night and a variety of genres during the month of December.  Bands and performers will be chosen by a panel of music-industry professionals.  Performers are invited to apply to be a part of the series on the Alliance’s website.  For tickets and information, visit www.alliancetheatre.org/clubhertz

DREAM HOU$E (world premiere, winner of the Alliance/Kendeda National Graduate Playwriting Competition)
January 22 – February 13, 2022​
Hertz Stage at Alliance Theatre​

By Eliana Pipes

DREAM HOU$E follows two Latinx sisters on an HGTV-style reality show who are selling their family home, hoping to capitalize on the gentrification in their “changing neighborhood.”  As they perform for the camera, one sister grapples with turmoil in the family’s ancestral past while the other learns how much she’s willing to sacrifice for the family’s future. What is the cultural cost of progress in America — and is cashing in always selling out?  DREAM HOU$E is the winner of the 2021/22 Alliance/Kendeda National Graduate Playwriting Competition.  For tickets and information, visit www.alliancetheatre.org/dreamhouse

KATHY & KEN BERNHARDT THEATRE FOR THE VERY YOUNG

SOUNDS OF THE WEST END​

August 17, 2021 – May 31, 2022

Streaming on Alliance Theatre Anywhere

Conceived and Directed by Ameenah Kaplan

Inspired by In the West End written by Will Power and illustrated by R. Gregory Christie, commissioned by the Alliance Theatre in partnership with the Mayor’s Summer Reading Club
This aural adventure will immerse you in the sounds of the historic Atlanta neighborhood.  From the talk on the sidewalks to the whoosh of the Marta trains, join us for a rhythmic and tasty trip through the epicenter of vegan cooking in Atlanta.  For tickets or information, visit www.alliancetheatre.org/sounds.  

THE CURIOUS CARDINAL

October 12, 2021 – May 31, 2022

Streaming on Alliance Theatre Anywhere

Written and Directed by Mark Valdez

A Palette Production
Original composition by Eugene H. Russell IV

Created in partnership with the Fernbank Museum of Natural History
As the seasons come and go in this GA forest, so too do all of the varied wildlife. Except, of course, for the curious cardinal, who stays put the entire year, curiously exploring all of the changes that the seasons bring. Join our cardinal as he bickers with the blue jays in spring, outwits the mischievous squirrels in summer, and bids a fond farewell to the friendly otters in the fall. This animated short celebrates the majesty of the natural habitats of GA and the daily adventures of an everchanging world.  For tickets and information, visit www.alliancetheatre.org/cardinal

(KNOCK, KNOCK)

December 2 – 23, 2021

Selig Family Blackbox Theatre at Alliance Theatre

Created by Olivia Aston Bosworth & Samantha Provenzano

Directed by Samantha Provenzano

Come in from out of the cold and celebrate community, family, and warmth this holiday season! Welcome to The Apartment Building. Below us, above us, and beside us, the residents are preparing for the holidays and trying to stay warm. Join us on a floor to floor adventure, meeting and celebrating with a variety of friends who all call The Apartment Building home. Surprises hide behind each door — all you need to do is (Knock, Knock). For tickets and information, visit www.alliancetheatre.org/knock

IN MY GRANNY’S GARDEN

March 16 – April 24, 2022 

Selig Family Blackbox Theatre at Alliance Theatre

Directed by Rosemary Newcott

Based on In My Granny’s Garden written be Pearl Cleage and Zaron Burnett Jr. and illustrated by Radcliffe Bailey, commissioned by the Alliance Theatre in partnership with the Mayor’s Summer Reading Club

In My Granny’s Garden invites our youngest audiences to explore the glory of growing your own food. Watch a tiny seed become a field of corn, green beans, collard greens, and bright red tomatoes. Step into a visual feast inspired by world renowned artist Radcliffe Bailey’s original paintings, and discover the one superpower that fuels Granny’s garden. This play promises to leave you nourished in body and soul.  For tickets and information, visit www.alliancetheatre.org/garden

DO YOU LOVE THE DARK? (world premiere)

January 20 – February 27, 2022 

Selig Family Blackbox Theatre at Alliance Theatre

Based on Do You Love the Dark? written by Maya Lawrence and illustrated by R. Gregory Christie commissioned by the Alliance Theatre in partnership with the Mayor’s Summer Reading Club Inspired by the Mayor’s Summer Reading Club original book by Maya Lawrence and illustrated by R. Gregory Christie, Do You Love the Dark? follows a young girl during a sleepless night trying to conquer her biggest fear of all: the dark!  This interactive play invites the audience on an unforgettable journey to not only conquer the fear of the unknown, but to transform it into love. Join us for this humungous hug of a play and discover all the good love glowing in the dark! For tickets and information, visit alliancetheatre.org/lovedark

Source: Alliance Theatre Press Release

Continue Reading

Around Atlanta

High Museum Announces Touring Exhibition Exploring Rise of Self-Taught Artists

Published

on

grandma moses
Grandma Moses (Anna Mary Robertson Moses , American, 1860 – 1961) , Rockabye , 1957 , o il on Masonite, c ourtesy of Galerie St. Etienne , New York . © Grandma Moses Properties Co., New York .

The High Museum of Art exhibition “Gatecrashers: The Rise of the Self-Taught Artist in America,” debuting this summer (Aug. 20-Dec. 11, 2021) and set to tour nationally, will celebrate more than a dozen early-20th-century painters who fundamentally reshaped who could be an artist in the United States. Featuring more than 60 works, “Gatecrashers” will investigate how artists including John Kane, Horace Pippin and Anna Mary Robertson “Grandma” Moses overcame class-, race- and gender-based obstacles to enter the inner sanctums of the mainstream art world, exhibiting their paintings widely and paving the way for later generations of self-taught artists. Following its presentation at the High, the exhibition will travel to the Brandywine River Museum of Art (May 28–Sept. 5, 2022) and The Westmoreland Museum of American Art (Oct. 30, 2022–Feb. 5, 2023).

“As one of the first American museums to establish a department dedicated to the work of self-taught artists, the High has spent decades studying, presenting and honoring their contributions to art history,” said Rand Suffolk, Nancy and Holcombe T. Green, Jr., director. “With this exhibition, our audience can see how they broke barriers of access to take their rightful place among the 20th century’s most celebrated contemporary artists.” 

After World War I, artists without formal training began showing their work in major museums, “crashing the gates” of the elite art world, as the newspapers of their day put it. Benefiting from rebellions against academic artistic styles and an ongoing search for national character in American culture, Kane, Pippin and Moses became the most widely recognized self-taught artists of the interwar period. These three artists will be featured prominently throughout “Gatecrashers” and will be joined by other self-taught artists, including Morris Hirshfield, Lawrence Lebduska and Josephine Joy, who represent the breadth of the art world’s attraction to self-taught painters in the first half of the 20th century. Despite their lack of formal training, these artists’ paintings of American life in the cities and rural communities where they lived, as well as fantastical scenes derived from their imaginations, were celebrated by fellow artists, collectors and taste-making museums such as New York’s Museum of Modern Art, especially in the 1930s and early 1940s. 

Horace Pippin (American, 1888–1946), The Buffalo Hunt , 1933, oil on canvas, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, purchase. Digital image © Whitney Museum of American Art/Licensed by Scala/Art Resource, New York

“Gatecrashers” is curated by the High’s Merrie and Dan Boone curator of folk and self-taught art, Katherine Jentleson, and is based on the book she authored of the same name, which was published in 2020. 

“‘Gatecrashers’ — both the book and the exhibition — establish an origin story for how self-taught artists first succeeded within the mainstream art world,” said Jentleson. “Kane, Moses, Pippin and the other artists in the exhibition deserve to be reconsidered not only because of how their work intertwined with major cultural and social change of their day, but also because of how their gatecrashing set the stage for the vital role that self-taught artists still play in the 21st century, greatly diversifying our cultural canons across race, gender, class, ability and other important markers of identity that are all too often underrepresented.” 

“Gatecrashers” will be organized in thematic sections that explore how these self-taught artists were embraced as examples of a uniquely American creative excellence and the role that their occupational histories played in advancing their reputations against the backdrop of Depression-era populism. The works on view also will demonstrate how alignments in style and subject matter led to exhibitions at major museums that integrated the artists’ work with that of their trained peers, foreshadowing how many museums today promote self-taught artists within their American and contemporary art displays. 

In 1927, Kane succeeded in placing his oil-on-canvas painting “Scene From the Scottish Highlands” in the Carnegie Museum of Art’s contemporary art international thanks to the jaunty painting’s embodiment of the stilted realism of historical folk art, which was gaining popularity among artists and collectors in this era. Many of the self-taught artists who would go on to be celebrated in the subsequent decade were first-generation immigrants like Kane, whose painting shows the Scottish American heritage festivals he attended in Pittsburgh. Brooklyn-based Jewish artists from Eastern Europe such as Morris Hirshfield and Israel Litwak also found audiences for their work, demonstrating how the art world slowly became more inclusive of who qualified as “American.”  

As African American artists struggled to find recognition in the largely segregated national arts scene, Pippin achieved great success with paintings like “Cabin in the Cotton” (ca. 1931-1937), a work set in the American South. In many of his works, including “Outpost Raid: Champagne Sector” (1931), Pippin recorded his experiences fighting in the trenches of World War I, where he was shot by a German sniper, resulting in an arm injury that he rehabilitated by painting. He lived in the part of Pennsylvania associated with the Brandywine River artists such as Newell Convers Wyeth, an early advocate of his work, and became a fixture in exhibitions of self-taught artists and in the first major surveys of African American artists that emerged by the end of the 1930s. 

In addition to expanding definitions of American art in terms of both race and ethnicity, self-taught artists such as Josephine Joy and “Grandma” Moses also broke through the art world’s gender glass ceiling. Joy became the first woman painter to have a solo exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art when her paintings of flowers, trees and sites near her home in San Diego were shown there in 1942. By that time, Moses was on a trajectory to stardom that was unprecedented for any artist in the United States — and arguably remains so — after her paintings were discovered hanging in the window of a New York pharmacist in 1938. Her pastoral scenes of life in New England became a potent force as the United States entered the Cold War era. Her paintings even traveled abroad to promote goodwill toward America, much to the chagrin of American critics who were more interested in promoting abstract painting abroad.  

“As self-taught artists become increasingly visible within today’s art world, this exhibition takes audiences back to the moment when it all began,” Jentleson said. 

“Gatecrashers” will be presented in the Special Exhibition Galleries on the Second Level of the Stent Family Wing. 

Exhibition Publication
“Gatecrashers: The Rise of the Self-Taught Artist in America,” is accompanied by Jentleson’s book of the same name, published by the University of California Press. 

Continue Reading

Around Atlanta

High Museum of Art Commissions New Accessible Piazza Installation, Continues Site-Specific Series

Published

on

Outside the Lines digital rendering , courtesy of Bryony Roberts Studio

Working with advocates with disabilities and their allies, Bryony Roberts Studio will create an inclusive and immersive environment

This summer, the High Museum of Art will present an immersive maze of accessible, sensory environments by award-winning design and research practice Bryony Roberts Studio as its seventh site-specific installation on The Woodruff Arts Center’s Carroll Slater Sifly Piazza. Titled “Outside the Lines,” the installation continues the High’s multiyear series of inclusive and inviting commissions to activate the Museum’s outdoor space and encourage community engagement. On view July 10 through Nov. 28, 2021, “Outside the Lines” emerged from conversations between Bryony Roberts Studio and self-advocates with disabilities and their allies throughout Atlanta, with the goal of creating a space that is engaging for all.   

“‘Outside the Lines’ builds on our tradition of attracting visitors of all ages with participatory art experiences and providing a gathering space for all Atlantans to stimulate their sense of wonder and play,” said Rand Suffolk, Nancy and Holcombe T. Green, Jr., director of the High. “We look forward to welcoming audiences with wide-ranging abilities to explore this year’s unique, outdoor installation.”         

“Outside the Lines” provides an environment that is accessible and playful for those with physical, developmental and/or intellectual disabilities, supporting discovery and social connection through an array of tactile environments. The installation aims to present a richer environment for everybody by offering spaces that celebrate a range of sensory experiences. 

“Bryony Roberts is a designer who understands the power and immense responsibility of public space by creating community-based projects involving multiple collaborators,” said Monica Obniski, the High’s curator of decorative arts and design. “For me, her research-driven methodology gives weight to the project’s objective, while the aesthetic ambitions of interlocking geometries and colorful tactile surfaces offer a visually stunning and joyful experience for all Atlantans.” 

The gently curving steel structure of “Outside the Lines” supports thousands of hanging strands, along the rise and fall of the frame, that will form both small enclosures for quiet relaxation and open environments for social interaction. Emulating a forest-like atmosphere, the tactile materials, designed in collaboration with individuals who are blind and visually impaired, invite safe interaction and enable dynamic navigation through touch. The variety and height of the materials provide a spectrum of exploration within reach of all people, including those who use wheelchairs and mobility devices, and produce a range of intensity and stimulation, offering choice for people with sensory sensitivities.

Community engagement is a central part of the design process at Bryony Roberts Studio, with extensive conversations and interviews with local residents informing both the design and programming of a project. For this project at the High, Bryony worked alongside self-advocates with disabilities and their allies to collaboratively imagine a space that would be both inviting and playful. Representatives from the Center for the Visually Impaired suggested ideas for tactile navigation and exploration, while parent advocates from Parent to Parent of Georgia described the benefits of interactive materials and quiet spaces for children with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Self-advocates helped to brainstorm spaces both for social interaction and restorative calm, while doctors from the Marcus Autism Center and Emory Brain Health offered further insights into the relationship between materials, colors, textures and experience. 

Outside the Lines elevation, courtesy of Bryony Roberts Studio

This project builds on the success of the six previous Piazza commissions: “Murmuration” by New York-based architectural firm SO – IL (2020); Japanese designer Yuri Suzuki’s “Sonic Playground” (2018); Spanish designer Jaime Hayon’s “Merry Go Zoo” (2017) and “Tiovivo” (2016); and 2014-2015’s “Mi Casa, Your Casa” and “Los Trompos” (“The Spinning Tops”) by Mexican designers Héctor Esrawe and Ignacio Cadena. 

Community Partners
Greg Aikens, BEGIN Program Manager, Center for the Visually Impaired
Shelby Ball, STARS Program Manager, Center for the Visually Impaired
Victoria Dugger, Artist
Lindsay Flax, Advocate
Paula E. Forney, MMSc, RPT
Dr. Madeleine Hackney, Associate Professor, Emory University School of Medicine
Eric Jacobson, Executive Director, Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities
Dr. Cheryl Kaiman, Program Director, Marcus Autism Center
Sitara Nayak, Vice President of Programs, Parent to Parent of Georgia
Mitzi Proffitt, Director of Support Services, Parent to Parent of Georgia 

About the High’s Piazza Activation Initiative   

The High’s Piazza activation initiative launched in 2014 to explore how engaging with art and design can extend beyond the Museum’s walls. Varied programs, art-making activities and other interactive features enliven these dynamic outdoor installations.  More info at high.org

Continue Reading

Read the Digital Edition

Subscribe

Peachtree Corners Life

Capitalist Sage

Topics and Categories

Recent Posts

Authors

Trending

Copyright © 2020 Mighty Rockets LLC, powered by WordPress.

Get Weekly Updates!

Get Weekly Updates!

Don't miss out on the latest news, updates, and stories about Peachtree Corners.

Check out our podcasts: Peachtree Corners Life, Capitalist Sage and the Ed Hour

You have Successfully Subscribed!