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Highball Celebrates the Best of Brunch Cocktails

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Atlanta’s leading mixologists will face off at the High Museum of Art’s 3rd annual Highball, an exclusive craft cocktail competition fundraiser featuring libations, light bites and lively music on Aug. 11, 2019, from 12:30 to 4 p.m., at The Fairmont. This year’s event has a Sunday Funday theme, with each bartender creating his or her best brunch-inspired drink. Early bird tickets will be available on June 3, and general admission tickets go on sale June 18. Visit www.high.org/highball for more information and to purchase tickets while supplies last. 
 
“Highball has given our patrons a unique and festive opportunity to raise a glass in celebration and support of the arts,” said Allison Chance, the High’s director of development. “We are very excited to see what the competitors mix up for this year’s theme and to toast the laid-back and sundrenched brunch atmosphere.” 
 
The 2019 Highball will feature 15 of Atlanta’s top bartenders, who were hand selected by the event’s host committee: 

·         Fernando Alonso (Casi Cielo)

·         James Cramer (Biltong Bar

·         Tiana Dillard (King + Duke

·         Greg Emilio (Bellina Alimentari)

·         Baylee Hopings (Empire State South

·         Erika Moore (Parlor

·         Colten Murray (9 Mile Station

·         Mitchell Oliver (King of Pops

·         Don Pirone (Brezza Cucina)

·         Gabriella Ramel (Iberian Pig Buckhead

·         Mathew Riggins (Negril Village Atlanta

·         Tokiwa Sears (Bar Margot

·         Jessica Smith (Urban Tree Cidery

·         Nik Soukavong (Little Trouble

·         Zee Zammit (The Consulate Atlanta

 
Each bartender will unveil his or her original cocktail recipe at the event to compete for Highball’s top honors. Guests are invited to sip each cocktail and vote for their favorites. Local judges, The Atlantan Editor Lauren Finney and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution Food and Dining Editor Ligaya Figueras, also will score each cocktail based on five categories: appearance, taste, complexity, balance and originality. Guest and critic votes will be combined to select first, second and third place winners: Luxury Mixologist, Top Shelf Mixologist and Classic Mixologist. In addition to bragging rights, each winning bartender will receive a cash prize. This year 
 
Throughout the afternoon, guests will enjoy music by DJ Teknology and breakfast-inspired bites by Dennis Dean catering. 
 
Doors will open at noon for VIP benefactor access, with general admission beginning at 12:30 p.m. Cocktail enthusiasts age 21 and older are encouraged to attend; all proceeds will benefit the High Museum of Art. Early bird tickets are $65 for High Museum of Art members and $85 for not-yet-members. Beginning on June 18, regularly priced single tickets will be available at $75 for Museum members and $95 for not-yet-members. Benefactor packages with exclusive benefits begin at $500. Tickets may be purchased online at www.high.org/highball. Guests are encouraged to break out their favorite brunch casual attire for the occasion. 
 
Event listing: 
 
Highball 
Sunday, Aug. 11, 2019 
12:30 to 4 p.m. 
VIP Benefactor access begins at noon, followed by general admission at 12:30 p.m. 
The Fairmont 
1429 Fairmont Ave NW, Atlanta, GA 30318 
 
Atlanta’s best bartenders compete in a head-to-head craft cocktail competition at this Sunday Funday-themed fundraiser benefiting the High Museum of Art. Guests will raise a glass for a top-shelf cause and vote for their favorite libation as they enjoy music and light bites. Single tickets are $75 for Museum members and $95 for not-yet-members. Benefactor packages begin at $500. More information and tickets available at www.high.org/highball
 
Highball Support 
Media Partner – The Atlantan 
Esprit de Pour – Atlanta Beverage Company 
 
 
About High Museum of Art 
Located in the heart of Atlanta, Georgia, the High Museum of Art connects with audiences from across the Southeast and around the world through its distinguished collection, dynamic schedule of special exhibitions and engaging community-focused programs. Housed within facilities designed by Pritzker Prize–winning architects Richard Meier and Renzo Piano, the High features a collection of more than 17,000 works of art, including an extensive anthology of 19th- and 20th-century American fine and decorative arts; major holdings of photography and folk and self-taught work, especially that of artists from the American South; burgeoning collections of modern and contemporary art, including paintings, sculpture, new media and design; a growing collection of African art, with work dating from pre-history through the present; and significant holdings of European paintings and works on paper. The High is dedicated to reflecting the diversity of its communities and offering a variety of exhibitions and educational programs that engage visitors with the world of art, the lives of artists and the creative process. For more information about the High, visit www.high.org

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Johns Creek Crawl

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Autrey Mill Nature Preserve, The City of Johns Creek, and Fulton County Water Resources Partner Join Autrey Mill Nature Preserve for a City of Johns Creek initiative as they clean up our City’s namesake- the Johns Creek on Saturday, August 24 . Homeowners along the creek are encouraged to venture into their backyards to help with the project. Debris and litter collected may be brought to Autrey Mill Nature Preserve where we will properly dispose of the waste.

Join Autrey Mill and Fulton County Water Resources down at the Old Alabama Johns Creek overpass where we will dip our toes, survey for fish, gather litter, and learn the process for Adopt-A-Stream Bacterial Monitoring. Afterward, the Fulton County Department of Public Works will take participants on a tour of the Tom Lowe Atlanta Fulton Water Treatment Facility. The tour is restricted to the first 20 participants and requires a minimum of 10. Tour participants must be over the age of 7 and wear closed-toe shoes.

  • 9:30 am Breakfast and Introductions at Autrey Mill
  • 10 am Adopt-a- Stream Bacterial Sampling Demonstration at Johns Creek
  • 10:30 am Creek Clean-Up- Gather and Talk Safety
  • 12 pm Transport trash back to Autrey Mill and Break for Lunch (sack lunch)
  • 12:45 pm Lowe Water Treatment Tour
    For more information about Autrey Mill, visit autreymill.org or call 678-366-3511. Autrey Mill Nature Preserve & Heritage Center is a non-profit, 501(c)3 charity, established in 1988. Mission: To create a destination and educational resource that inspires exploration, appreciation, and preservation of the natural environment and local history.

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Around Atlanta

Get Ready to Travel Japan – Olympics 2020!

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Experience Japan like never before at this year’s annual JapanFest Atlanta! Our 33rd JapanFest is all about “traveling” to Japan to enjoy the traditions, natural beauty, and pop culture of the nation that is hosting the 2020 Olympics.

JapanFest 2019 will provide visitors with a unique way to get ready for the 2020 Olympics by learning about Japan through a wide array of performances, presentations, and authentic national cuisine that will entertain, educate, and delight.

JapanFest Weekend is on September 21-22, 2019, from 10 am to 6 pm (Saturday) and 10am to 5pm (Sunday) at the Infinite Energy Center, located at 6400 Sugarloaf Parkway, Duluth, GA. Tickets for an entire day are $10 in advance, $12 at the door.

This year’s headlining performers include Nozomi Takeda, Marie Kondo’s senior executive consultant who has worked with Kondo since the very beginning in teaching the KonMari “Spark Joy” Method of tidying up homes across America. Also coming from Tokyo will be Tomomi Kunishige, well-known for her dramatic art exhibition-style of Japanese calligraphy that includes English words.

What else is on the schedule:

  • The ever-popular Matsuriza Taiko Drummers, a Japanese taiko drum troupe of five powerful drummers, will perform and conduct workshops.
  • Samurai Sword Soul will show off their dramatic sword techniques and demonstrate the “Way of the Warrior.”
  • Street Theater Artist Mariko Iwasa, an accomplished actress in an array of theater genres including kabuki, clowning, and mime, will show us that, “We can say anything without words.”
  • Minyo Station, a Japanese Folk Music Troupe from Los Angeles, combines traditional and western instruments for an eclectic, original jazz sound.
  • Motoko the Storyteller will mesmerize children and adults alike with both funny and scary Japanese tales told in English.
  • The traditional Japanese tea ceremony, sumo wrestling, karate and ninja performances, Japanese flower arranging, traditional Japanese dancing and more will all be a part of the festival entertainment program as well.

Two of JapanFest’s most popular areas are its Japanese Food Court and Anime Village. Visitors can also head down Ginza Dori, named after Tokyo’s famous shopping district. This main street will feature Japanese festival-style games, Japanese ceramics, traditional Japanese clothing, accessories, and toys.

In the “Olympic Village,” more vendors will display their wares and art products, for a total of over 120 vendors. In addition, visitors can experience both the old and new of Japanese culture by trying on a kimono, or, for those who want to dress up as their favorite animation character, participate in a Cosplay Contest.

The recently released and highly acclaimed family-friendly film, Mirai, will be screened twice each day, once in English and once in Japanese. Visitors can purchase tickets to the film Mirai onsite during festival days at the box office for just $6.

As the largest Japan-related event in the Southeast, thanks to the generous involvement of the Japanese community and Japanese businesses in Georgia, this is an opportunity to share all things Japanese with Georgia and the surrounding states.

Many of the approximately 550 Japanese companies based in Georgia will display their products in the “Japanese Businesses in Georgia” exhibition (JBiG) including their latest in Japanese technology, such as automobiles, tractors, and electronics.

Tickets for an entire day are $10 in advance, $12 at the door and cover all performances except the film Mirai ($6) for those who wish to attend. Teachers (K-12) can bring their students to JapanFest for free by applying via their educational institution online at www.japanfest.org. College student discounts are available, and other organizations can save money by purchasing advance ticket packages online.

Original JapanFest designer t-shirts will be on sale for $20 to help support our educational programs.

JapanFest is a production of JapanFest Inc., a 501(c )(3)educational nonprofit organization, in association with the Japanese Chamber of Commerce of Georgia and the Japan America Society of Georgia, and is supported by the Consulate General of Japan in Atlanta. JapanFest would not be possible without the help of over 200 volunteers. Tickets can be purchased at www.japanfest.org. No pets other than guide dogs are allowed inside the convention center. For more information, call 404-842-0736 or visit www.japanfest.org.

Sponsors
Platinum-Delta Air Lines; Gold-Aflac Incorporated; The Coca-Cola Company; Silver- Taylor English Duma; TV JAPAN/NHK Cosmomedia America, Inc.; TDK Components USA, Inc.; WSB TV Channel 2; Bronze- Georgia Asian Times; Georgia Power Company; LeafFilter, Miura America Co. LTD; MomoCon; Sapporo USA, Inc.; Temple University Japan Campus; TOTO USA Inc.; Fuji- American Honda Motor Co., Inc. Power Equipment Division; Baker Donelson; Dexerials America Corporation; Georgia Army National Guard; Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport; Hoso Media; Novis Creative; Smith, Gambrell & Russell LLP; TD Automotive Compressor Georgia, LLC; WOWNOW Inc.; Niche Import Co.; Yamaha Motor Corp. USA; Capture Cliques, Inc.; Sakura- Anime Weekend Atlanta, AXIS Atlanta; Ernst & Young LLP; Honda Precision Parts of Georgia; Yachiyo Mfg. of America; Hylant; Ume- Atlanta Parent Magazine; AT&T; Brandon Hall School; In Memory of Shigenobu Machida; KPMG; Panasonic Automotive Systems; Toppan Printing; JapanFest is also made possible in part by- Center for Global Partnership; Chopstix for Charity, NAAAP Atlanta Chapter; Explore Gwinnett; South Arts, Inc., and The Japan Foundation.

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High Museum of Art to Present “Sally Mann: A Thousand Crossings” This Fall

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For more than 40 years, Sally Mann (American, b. 1951) has made experimental, elegiac and hauntingly beautiful photographs that explore the overarching themes of existence: memory, desire, death, the bonds of family and nature’s indifference to human endeavor. This fall, the High Museum of Art will present the first major survey of her work to travel internationally, “Sally Mann: A Thousand Crossings” (Oct. 19, 2019–Feb. 2, 2020).

Sally Mann (American, born 1951), Triptych, 2004, 3 gelatin silver prints, The Sir Elton John Photography Collection

Organized by the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., and the Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts, the exhibition presents figure studies, landscapes and architectural views that are united by their common origin and inspiration in the American South. Using her deep love of her homeland and her knowledge of its historically fraught heritage, Mann asks powerful, provocative questions—about history, identity, race and religion—that reverberate across geographic and national boundaries.

The exhibition is co-curated by the High’s recently appointed Donald and Marilyn Keough Family Curator of Photography Sarah Kennel (previously with the Peabody Essex Museum), who developed the project with Sarah Greenough, senior curator of photographs at the National Gallery.

“I’m thrilled to launch my tenure at the High with ‘A Thousand Crossings,’ an exhibition that is not only dear to my heart, but also makes perfect sense for the museum, which awarded Sally Mann the first ‘Picturing the South’ commission in 1996. Mann’s drive to ask the big questions—about love, death, war, race and the fraught process of growing up—coupled with her ability to coax powerful emotional resonances from the materials of her art make her one of today’s most compelling artists.”

“With this exhibition we continue to recognize of the importance of Mann’s work, which explores themes that will strongly resonate with our regional audience but that also addresses universal human concerns,” said Rand Suffolk, the High’s Nancy and Holcombe T. Greene, Jr., director. “We are delighted to have Sarah on board to lead the project, and we look forward to bringing these powerful photographs to Atlanta.”

“Sally Mann: A Thousand Crossings” investigates how Mann’s relationship with the South—a place rich in literary and artistic traditions but troubled by history—has shaped her work. The exhibition brings together 109 photographs, including new and previously unpublished work, and is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalog that offers an in-depth exploration of the evolution of Mann’s art.

Organized into five sections—Family, The Land, Last Measure, Abide with Me and What Remains, the exhibition opens with works from the 1980s, when Mann began to photograph her three children at the family’s remote summer cabin on the Maury River near Lexington, Virginia. Made with an 8-x-10-inch view camera, the family pictures refute the stereotypes of childhood, offering instead unsettling visions of its complexity. Rooted in the experience of the natural environment surrounding the cabin—the Arcadian woodlands, rocky cliffs and languid rivers—these works convey the inextricable link between the family and their land and the sanctuary and freedom that it provided them.

The exhibition continues in The Land with photographs of the swamplands, fields and ruined estates Mann encountered as she traveled across Virginia, Georgia, Louisiana and Mississippi in the 1990s. Hoping to capture what she called the “radical light of the American South,” Mann made pictures in Virginia that glow with a tremulous light, while those made in Louisiana and Mississippi are more blasted and bleak. In these photographs, Mann also began to experiment with her process, employing antique lenses, high-contrast Ortho film and the 19th-century wet plate collodion process. The resulting photographic effects, including light flares, vignetting, blurs, streaks and scratches, serve as metaphors for the South as a site of memory, violence, ruin and rebirth.

Mann used these same techniques for her photographs of Civil War battlefields in the exhibition’s third section, Last Measure. These brooding and elusive pictures evoke the land as history’s graveyard, silently absorbing the blood and bones of the many thousands who perished in battles such as Antietam, Appomattox, Chancellorsville, Cold Harbor, Fredericksburg, Manassas, Spotsylvania and the Wilderness.

In the early 2000s, Mann continued to reflect on how slavery and segregation had left their mark on the landscape of Virginia and, in turn, shaped her own childhood. The fourth section, Abide with Me, explores these entwined histories. Two groups of photographs imagine the physical and spiritual pathways for African Americans in antebellum and post–Civil War Virginia: the rivers and swamps that were potential escape routes for enslaved people and the churches that promised safe harbor, communion and spiritual deliverance. This section also includes photographs of Virginia Carter, the African American woman who served as Mann’s primary caregiver. 

A defining and beloved presence in Mann’s life, Carter taught Mann about the profoundly complicated and charged nature of race relations in the South. The last component of this section is a group of pictures of African American men rendered in large prints (50 x 40 inches) made from collodion negatives. Representing the artist’s desire to reach across what she described as “the seemingly untraversable chasm of race in the American South,” these powerful photographs explore Mann’s own position in relation to the region’s fraught racial history.

The final section of the exhibition, What Remainsexplores themes of time, transformation and death through photographs of Mann and her family. Her enduring fascination with decay and the body’s vulnerability to the ravages of time is evident in a series of spectral portraits of her children’s faces and intimate photographs detailing the changing body of her husband, Larry, who suffers from muscular dystrophy. The exhibition closes with several riveting self-portraits Mann made in the wake of an accident. Here, her links to Southern literature and her preoccupation with decay are in full evidence: the pitted, scratched, ravaged and cloudy surfaces of the prints function as analogues for the body’s corrosion and death. The impression of the series as a whole is of an artist confronting her own mortality with composure and conviction.

“Sally Mann: A Thousand Crossings” will be presented in the High’s Anne Cox Chambers Wing.

About Sally Mann
Born in 1951 in Lexington, Virginia, Mann continues to live and work in Rockbridge County. She developed her first roll of film in 1969 and began to work as a professional photographer in 1972. She attended Bennington College, Vermont, and graduated in 1974 with a Bachelor of Arts in literature from Hollins College, Roanoke, Virginia, where she earned a Master of Arts in creative writing the following year. She has exhibited widely and published her photographs in the books “Second Sight: The Photographs of Sally Mann” (1983), “Sweet Silent Thought: Platinum Prints by Sally Mann” (1987), “At Twelve: Portraits of Young Women” (1988), “Immediate Family” (1992), “Still Time” (1994), “Mother Land: Recent Landscapes of Georgia and Virginia” (1997), “What Remains” (2003), “Deep South” (2005), “Sally Mann: Photographs and Poetry” (2005), “Proud Flesh” (2009), “Sally Mann: The Flesh and the Spirit” (2010) and “Remembered Light: Cy Twombly in Lexington”(2016). Mann’s bestselling memoir, “Hold Still: A Memoir with Photographs”(2015), was a finalist for the National Book Award. In 1996, Mann was selected to inaugurate the High’s “Picturing the South” photography series, a distinctive initiative that creates new bodies of work inspired by the American South for the Museum’s collection. She has received numerous other honors as well as grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Guggenheim Foundation. In 2011 Mann delivered the prestigious William E. Massey Sr. Lectures in the History of American Civilization at Harvard University.

Exhibition Catalog
Published by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, and the Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts, in association with Abrams, this richly illustrated monograph constitutes an in-depth exploration of the evolution of Mann’s art through its five sections:Family, The Land, Last Measure, Abide with Me and What Remains. Plate sections are enriched by the inclusion of quotations from Mann herself and from her most beloved authors. Essays by curators Sarah Greenough and Sarah Kennel analyze Mann’s photographic development in concert with her literary interests and Mann’s family photographs, respectively. In their valuable contributions, Hilton Als, New Yorker staff writer and recipient of the 2017 Pulitzer Prize for Criticism; Malcolm Daniel, Gus and Lyndall Wortham Curator of Photography, The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; and Drew Gilpin Faust, former president and Lincoln Professor of History, Harvard University, explore literary and photographic responses to racism in the South, Mann’s debt to 19th-century photographers and techniques, and the landscape as repository of cultural and personal memory. Featuring 230 color illustrations, the 332-page catalog will be available at the High Museum Shop.

Exhibition Organization and Support
“Sally Mann: A Thousand Crossings” is organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, and the Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts. This exhibition is made possible by Premier Exhibition Series Sponsor Delta Air Lines, Inc.; Exhibition Series Sponsors Georgia Natural Gas, Northside Hospital and WarnerMedia; Premier Exhibition Series Supporters the Antinori Foundation, Sarah and Jim Kennedy, Louise Sams and Jerome Grilhot, and wish foundation; Benefactor Exhibition Series Supporter Anne Cox Chambers Foundation; Ambassador Exhibition Series Supporters Tom and Susan Wardell and Rod Westmoreland; and Contributing Exhibition Series Supporters Lucinda W. Bunnen, Marcia and John Donnell, W. Daniel Ebersole and Sarah Eby-Ebersole, Peggy Foreman, Robin and Hilton Howell, Mr. and Mrs. Baxter Jones, Margot and Danny McCaul, Joel Knox and Joan Marmo, and The Ron and Lisa Brill Family Charitable Trust. Generous support is also provided by the Alfred and Adele Davis Exhibition Endowment Fund, Anne Cox Chambers Exhibition Fund, Barbara Stewart Exhibition Fund, Dorothy Smith Hopkins Exhibition Endowment Fund, Eleanor McDonald Storza Exhibition Endowment Fund, The Fay and Barrett Howell Exhibition Fund, Forward Arts Foundation Exhibition Endowment Fund, Helen S. Lanier Endowment Fund, Isobel Anne Fraser–Nancy Fraser Parker Exhibition Endowment Fund, John H. and Wilhelmina D. Harland Exhibition Endowment Fund, Katherine Murphy Riley Special Exhibition Endowment Fund, Margaretta Taylor Exhibition Fund, and the RJR Nabisco Exhibition Endowment Fund.

About the High Museum of Art
Located in the heart of Atlanta, Georgia, the High Museum of Art connects with audiences from across the Southeast and around the world through its distinguished collection, dynamic schedule of special exhibitions and engaging community-focused programs. Housed within facilities designed by Pritzker Prize–winning architects Richard Meier and Renzo Piano, the High features a collection of more than 17,000 works of art, including an extensive anthology of 19th- and 20th-century American fine and decorative arts; major holdings of photography and folk and self-taught work, especially that of artists from the American South; burgeoning collections of modern and contemporary art, including paintings, sculpture, new media and design; a growing collection of African art, with work dating from pre-history through the present; and significant holdings of European paintings and works on paper. The High is dedicated to reflecting the diversity of its communities and offering a variety of exhibitions and educational programs that engage visitors with the world of art, the lives of artists and the creative process. For more information about the High, visit www.high.org.

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